ARE 6247c: Spring 2013

 

Assignment: Assessment Task

Overview:

 

Read over the Family Portrait lesson plan (below). Then, devise an assessment strategy to evaluate students’ performance on each of the (3) learning outcomes described in the lesson objectives.  Add your assessment strategies to the lesson plan (within the appropriate place). Then, save your revised lesson plan using the following name: yourlastname_assessmentTask.docx. Submit your revised lesson plan (containing your assessment strategies) to the designated assignment dropbox.

 

Hint:  To access this assignment, click on Assignments from the course tools menu in the left-hand margin and click on Assessment Task.

 

Refer to the Course Schedule for due date.

 

Key Task: The following Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPS) will be assessed in this task.  The assessment strategies you develop for this task should reflect a “developing” or higher understanding of ways you can achieve each FEAP listed as a practicing art teacher.

 

FEAP #

Description

Unsatisfactory

Developing

Accomplished

Exceptional

1.d

Selects appropriate formative assessments to monitor learning

 

 

 

 

5.c

Use a variety of data, independently, and in collaboration with colleagues, to evaluate learning outcomes, adjust planning and continuously improve the effectiveness of the lessons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LESSON TITLE: FAMILY PORTRAIT

GRADE LEVEL: 3rd or 4th grade

 

Overview: The family theme has inspired artists from many cultures over the years. Artists often paint portraits of their wives or husbands, of their children and of their parents. These are the people that the artist sees most often and knows best. In this lesson, students examine the meaning of ""family," analyze several family portraits and then paint portraits of their own families.

 

Next Generation Sunshine Standards:  Students will: (1) manipulate tools and media to enhance communication in personal artworks; (2) use materials, tools, and processes to achieve an intended result in two- and/or three-dimensional artworks; (3)  explain the similarities and differences between artworks and utilitarian objects; and (4) compare differences or similarities in artworks across time and culture.

 

Objectives: Students will: (1) analyze different ways artists depict the family theme in portraiture; (2) create portraits of their own families using a crayon resist technique; and (3) through written response, reflect upon and explain their decisions and choices for depicting their family in a portrait.

 

Materials: 12x18 inch white paper, an assortment of crayons including multicultural skin tones, watercolor paints, water containers, paint brushes, and paint shirts. Digital slides or art prints of artworks depicting the “family” theme.

 

Introduction: Discuss with students the different types of family units that people belong to (e.g., two-parent families; single-parent families, extended families, and so on.). Look at various family photographs, casual and formal. Then, show a family portrait from the 19th century or earlier such as Francisco Goya's The Family of Charles IV. Explain that before there were cameras, people who could afford to commissioned artists to paint portraits of their families (i.e., painting portraits was once a good way for artists to make a living.) Write the word commission on the board along with a definition like "hiring an artist to make a work of art for you."

 

As time permits, show several works depicting the "family" theme (Note: These works should be representative of different cultures, time periods and media and include self portraits of artists with their families. See suggested artists and works at the end of this lesson.) Ask probing questions which encourage students to notice expressive elements in the works as well as similarities and differences in approach to the subject matter. (e.g., "What can you tell me about this family by looking at their portrait?" or "How is this family the same or different as your family?")

 

To introduce the studio activity, say something like: "Imagine that you are going to paint a portrait of yourself with your family. How will your family pose for their picture? (e.g., sitting, standing, playing, etc.,) What is a favorite activity that your family does together? (e.g., camping, boating, swimming, etc.,) Who will you include in your portrait? (e.g.., Your mother, father, brother, sister, aunt, uncle, grandparents, pets, friends, etc.,)"

 

Studio Activity: (1) Pass out 12x18 inch white paper and crayons to each student. (2) Instruct students to draw (in contour form) their composition using crayon, making sure that they include a background that helps to show what type of activity their family is doing. (3) Next, have the students color in the figures with crayon using light, rich colors while leaving the background as an outline. (4) Pass out the watercolor sets, brushes, water containers, and painting shirts. Have the students fill in the background using mostly dark, rich colors from the watercolor sets. Encourage them to create new colors by mixing primary colors. (5) When the paintings are finished, have the students sign, date and title their paintings.

 

Closure: During the following class period, allow students to share their family portraits with the class. Encourage them to participate in the sharing period by paying them fake "artist dollars” as though they were commissioned to do the portraits. Allow the students to talk about their work by reading what they wrote about their families. Have them point out new colors they created in their paintings by mixing primary colors.

 

Assessment:

 

The assessment process will include both formative and summative aspects. 

 

Formative:

 

The two formative components for measuring objective one will consist of:

            A. observed student feedback related to the open ended questions listed during the the introductory activity related to the showing of several works that depict the “family” theme.

            B. informal discussions with students as we talk about their product

 

  The formative component for measuring objective two will consist of:

            A.  my confirming the successful completion of each step 2 through 4 during the studio activity by actively observing student progress and establishing specific dates for the completion of each step.

            B. informal observation of student behaviors as they work in pairs and critique the progress of each other’s work.

 

The formative component for measuring objective three will consist of:

            A. providing for the students at the beginning of the project the particular questions that I expect them to address in their written response.

            B. Checking student understanding related to each question during my informal discussions with them related to their projects

            C.  students to work in pairs and explain to each other their responses to the specific questions.

 

Summative:

 

The summative assessment will consist of evaluating the completeness of the responses associated with the topics to be addressed in the written document and the student’s presentation and participation during the final critique.  A timeframe of three to five minutes will be established for each presentation with the remainder of the students having the option of providing verbal feedback or written feedback on the established form.  I will also identify a counselor, fellow teacher, or other school staff to participate in the critique to both reduce possible prejudices associated with the subjective component of the critique process as well as allowing other professionals to observe the process to help provide constructive feedback to me for improving the process.  The students will address four basic topics in their written response:

            A. they will identify three different ways that artists have depicted families and provide at least two reasons that they selected their particular methodology for depiction.

            B. They will identify the reason(s) that they selected their particular background and the color choices associated with the background.

            C. They will identify the people in the portrait, at least two characteristics they employed to make each person different, and the reason(s) they chose each characteristic.

            D. They will critque their own artistic piece by identifying the intended mood of the piece, how successfully they achieved the mood, and at least two choices they incorporated into the production of the piece that aided in developing the intended mood.        

 

Rubric for Formative Evaluation of “Family Portrait”

Category

Excellent:

Mary Poppins -practically perfect in every way

Hercules – became a god by combining developing strength, wisdom and compassion

Above Average:

Simba - the young lion king who is very good but still needs to learn a few things

Nola – lioness who is wise and supportive but still needs to learn a few things

Average:

Crush – the sea turtle that does some good things but spends most of life going with the flow in order to not put out much effort

 

 

 

Needs Improvement:

Aladdin – A diamond in the rough

Cinderella – a princess waiting to be discovered

Analyze ways artists depict the family theme in a portrait

Demonstrates analysis skills by dong all three: 1) answers more than one open-ended question, 2) describes similarities and differences between two or more paintings, and  3) responds to comments made by others

Demonstrates analysis skills by doing two of the three: 1)answers one open-ended question, 2) describes similarities and differences between two or more paintings, or 3) responds to comments made by others

Demonstrates analysis skills by doing one of the three: 1) answers one open-ended question, 2) describes similarities and differences between two or more paintings, or 3) responds to comments made by others 

Does not demonstrate any of the analysis skills described

Analyze ways artists depict the family theme in a portrait

Demonstrates analysis skills by making reference to  three  or more concepts/artists addressed during the introductory process while having informal discussions with the teacher about his/her product

Demonstrates analysis skills by making reference to  two concepts/artists addressed during the introductory process while having informal discussions with the teacher about his/her product

Demonstrates analysis skills by making reference to  one concept/artist addressed during the introductory process while having informal discussions with the teacher about his/her product

Does not demonstrate analysis skills by making reference to any concepts/artists addressed during the introductory process while having informal discussions with the teacher about his/her product

Create portrait of their own family

Demonstrates successful completion of steps 2 – 4 by allof the following: 1) completes each step by the assigned due date; 2) the student can explain how the background is associated with family activity being portrayed in the project; 3) the student uses mostly light rich colors (no more than two dark rich colors) to fill-in the family characters; 4) the student uses mostly dark rich colors (no more than two light rich colors) to fill-in the background; 5) the student creates at least two new colors by mixing water colors

(rich colors are defined as deep, strong or vivid)

Demonstrates successful completion of steps 2 – 4 by allof the following: 1) completes each step by the assigned due date; 2) the student can explain how the background is associated with family activity being portrayed in the project; 3) the student uses mostly light rich colors (no more than three dark rich colors) to fill-in the family characters; 4) the student uses mostly dark rich colors (no more than three light rich colors) to fill-in the background; 5) the student creates one new color by mixing water colors

(rich colors are defined as deep, strong, or vivid)

Demonstrates successful completion of steps 2 – 4 by allof the following 1) completes two of three steps by the assigned due date; 2) the student can explain how the background is associated with family activity being portrayed in the project; 3) the student uses mostly light rich colors (no more than three dark rich colors) to fill-in the family characters but also includes colors that are not rich; 4) the student uses mostly dark rich colors (no more than three light rich colors) to fill-in the background but also includes colors that are not rich; 5) the student does not create any new color by mixing water colors

(rich colors are defined as deep, strong or vivid)

Does not  demonstrates successful completion of steps 2 – 4 by doing any of the following: 1) completing only one or none of three steps by the assigned due date; 2) the student cannot explain how the background is associated with family activity being portrayed in the project; 3) the student uses some  light rich colors (fewer than half of the colors) to fill-in the family characters;  4) the student uses some dark rich colors (fewer than half of the colors) to  fill-in the background

(rich colors are defined as deep, strong or vivid)

Create portrait of their own family

Teacher informal observation of  paired students during steps 2 - 4  indicates that the student offers at least one comment or suggestion related to their partner’s project, or the student creating the project is observed making adjustments to the project based on self-critical analysis

 

 

Teacher informal observation of paired students during steps 2 – 4 indicates that the student does not offer at least one comment or suggestion related to their partner’s project, or the student creating the project is not observed making adjustments to the project based on self-critical analysis

Written Response

During informal discussions with the students the student will be able to answer at least one question related to the written response and provide supporting evidence from concepts/artists discussed during the unit

 

 

During informal discussions with the students the student does not provide a response to at least one question related to the written response that includes  supporting evidence from concepts/artists discussed during the unit

Written Response

During informal observation of the students I hear them talking about at least one question related to the written response, or I see evidence that they are taking notes on the sheet provided to them that include the questions

 

 

During informal observation of the students I do nothear them talking about at least one question related to the written response, or I see evidence that they are taking notes on the sheet provided to them that include the questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rubric for Summative Evaluation of “Family Portrait”

Category

Excellent:

Mary Poppins -practically perfect in every way

Hercules – became a god by combining developing strength, wisdom and compassion

Above Average:

Simba - the young lion king who is very good but still needs to learn a few things

Nola – lioness who is wise and supportive but still needs to learn a few things

Average:

Crush – the sea turtle that does some good things but spends most of life going with the flow in order to not put out much effort

 

Needs Improvement:

Aladdin – A diamond in the rough

Cinderella – a princess waiting to be discovered

Presentation

The student is able to do all of the following:

1) verbalize the artist that they are modeling in their project and 2 ways that their project emulates the artist; 2) they will be able to verbalize the difference between light rich and dark rich colors; 3) they will identify each person in their picture and at least two characteristics they utilized to make the person different from the other people in the picture; 4) they will be able to verbalize at least 3 examples of how they used color to help create the mood of the portrait

The student is able to do all of the following:

1) verbalize the artist that they are modeling in their project and 1 way that their project emulates the artist; 2) they will be able to verbalize the difference between light rich and dark rich colors; 3) they will identify each person in their picture and at least one characteristic they utilized to make the person different from the other people in the picture; 4) they will be able to verbalize 2 examples of how they used color to help create the mood of the portrait

The student is able to do all of the following:

1) verbalize the artist that they are modeling in their project ; 2) they will be able to verbalize the difference between light rich and dark rich colors; 3) they will identify each person in their picture; 4) they will be able to verbalize one example of  how they used color to help create the mood of the portrait

The student is not able to do all of the following:

1) verbalize the artist that they are modeling in their project ; 2) they will be able to verbalize the difference between light rich and dark rich colors; 3) they will identify each person in their picture; 4) they will be able to verbalize one example of  how they used color to help create the mood of the portrait

Critique

The student actively participate in the critique process by either making a suggestion on how at least two  pieces could be improved and/or how the piece is similar or different to an artist not chosen by the student presenting

 

 

The student does not actively participate in the critique process by either making a suggestion on how at least two  pieces could be improved and/or how the piece is similar or different to an artist not chosen by the student presenting

Written Response

The student does all of the following:

1)they will identify three different ways that artists have depicted families and provide at least two reasons that they selected their particular methodology for depiction; 2)

 they will identify the reason(s) that they selected their particular background and the color choices associated with the background;

3) they will identify the people in the portrait, at least two characteristics they employed to make each person different, and the reason(s) they chose each characteristic; 4) they will critique their own artistic piece by identifying the intended mood of the piece, how successfully they achieved the mood, and at least two choices they incorporated into the production of the piece that aided in developing the intended mood.       

 

The student does three of the following:

1)they will identify three different ways that artists have depicted families and provide at least two reasons that they selected their particular methodology for depiction; 2)

 they will identify the reason(s) that they selected their particular background and the color choices associated with the background;

3) they will identify the people in the portrait, at least two characteristics they employed to make each person different, and the reason(s) they chose each characteristic; 4) they will critique their own artistic piece by identifying the intended mood of the piece, how successfully they achieved the mood, and at least two choices they incorporated into the production of the piece that aided in developing the intended mood.       

 

The student does two of the following:

1)they will identify three different ways that artists have depicted families and provide at least two reasons that they selected their particular methodology for depiction; 2)

 they will identify the reason(s) that they selected their particular background and the color choices associated with the background;

3) they will identify the people in the portrait, at least two characteristics they employed to make each person different, and the reason(s) they chose each characteristic; 4) they will critique their own artistic piece by identifying the intended mood of the piece, how successfully they achieved the mood, and at least two choices they incorporated into the production of the piece that aided in developing the intended mood.       

 

The student does one or none of the following:

1)they will identify three different ways that artists have depicted families and provide at least two reasons that they selected their particular methodology for depiction; 2)

 they will identify the reason(s) that they selected their particular background and the color choices associated with the background;

3) they will identify the people in the portrait, at least two characteristics they employed to make each person different, and the reason(s) they chose each characteristic; 4) they will critique their own artistic piece by identifying the intended mood of the piece, how successfully they achieved the mood, and at least two choices they incorporated into the production of the piece that aided in developing the intended mood.       

 

 

 

Grading Scale:

A perfect score is represented by 36 points by earning 4 points in each of the 9 different categories listed on the formative and summative assessment rubrics.  The following scale will be utilized in assigning final grade categories:

Mary Poppins/Hercules:  27 to 36 points

Simba/Nola: 20 to 26 points

Crush: 16 to 19 points

Aladdin/Cinderella:  less than 16 points

 

 

 

Artists and Works of Art Studied: Examples of artists who have dealt with this theme:

 

·         Francisco Goya (The Family of Charles IV)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_IV_of_Spain_and_His_Family

·         John S Copley  (The Copley Family)
http://bit.ly/WSASYL

·         Romare Bearden (Family)
http://bit.ly/X9l9Ty

·         Marisol (Escobar) (The Family)
http://bit.ly/YFEWAK

·         Henry Moore (Family Group)

http://bit.ly/14sI9mE

·         Carman Lomas Garza (Cascarones)
http://blog.austinkids.org/2009/03/30/cascarones

 

Extensions:  As students finish up their work instruct them to write a short story about the people in their painting considering questions like: “Who are these people? What do they mean to you? What is your family doing in your painting? How have you chosen to depict your family in their portrait?”